Makeup for an Interview

  • Makeup Foundation: Wear a foundation that has light to medium coverage. Do not wear full coverage foundation, even if you have a lot of blemishes and discoloration. Full coverage makeup foundation can look extremely cakey and thick, especially when worn in broad daylight.
  • Stay Neutral: Although wearing colorful eye shadow can be fun and youthful, an interview is not the appropriate place to wear colorful makeup. Apply an eye primer, followed by a dusting of eye shadow that matches your skin tone. This will cover little veins, redness and uneven skin tone on your eyelids. Next, find an eye shadow that is half a shade darker than your skin tone. Using a crease brush, apply this shade in your natural crease and lightly blend upward. Stop here! Do not use more than two eye shadow colors.
  • Eyeliner: Skip the black eyeliner just this once. Instead, opt for a creamy brown eyeliner using a kohl eye pencil. Apply the eye liner on your top lash line, and do not wear any eyeliner on your bottom lash line. Be sure to smudge the top lash line with a smudge brush or pencil brush, so that the eyeliner looks natural. It should look like your natural lash line, just slightly enhanced. When done correctly, your eyelashes look fuller and your eyes look more alert and open.
  • Professional Pout: Wear a tinted lip balm rather than lipstick. It is far too risky to wear lipstick to an interview, as lipstick can wind up on your teeth. Additionally, lipstick has fallen out of favor in recent years, with employers preferring a more natural look. Lipstick has a tendency to look too dramatic, even if you opt for neutral pinks. Everyone knows that isn’t your natural lip color! Save the reds and fuschias for date night.
  • Fragrant Faux Pas: Do not wear perfume to a job interview. It goes without saying that you ought to be neat, clean and presentable when going to an interview. But you may be unaware that it has become el-passé to wear fragrances to interviews. Many people have allergies to the floral ingredients and botanicals commonly found in perfume and cologne. And, even if your potential employer isn’t allergic or sensitive to fragrances, you run the risk of wearing a scent the employer simply does not like. How terrible would it be if you missed out on a job simply because the employer hates the smell of Hypnotic Poison or Angel?